Tuesday, August 12, 2008

Napoleon's Square

card gamesTwo Entire Packs of Cards

* Only the uppermost cards of the packets in the square are available until, by their removal, the cards underneath are released, but the whole of the square may be examined.
* When a vacancy in the square is caused by the removal of an entire packet, the space may be filled by one card from the talon or pack, but this need not be done until a favorable opportunity occurs.
* All the foundations must follow suit.

Deal out twelve packets, each consisting of four cards dealt together, so as to form three sides of a square, leaving space in the centre for the eight aces. These are the foundation cards, and are to ascend in sequence to kings.

If any aces appear on the surface of the square, play them in their allotted places, as also any other suitable cards.

You next proceed to form marriages in a descending line with the cards of the square, subject to Rule I. As usual, great judgment must be exercised in making these changes, lest cards underneath should be blocked by a sequence of higher cards of the same suit. If this were to occur in two packets, i.e., if in both cases sequences, say, of diamonds blocked lower cards of the same suit, success would be impossible.

Note.—If after dealing the square two kings of one suit were found to be blocking two smaller cards of that suit, either the whole must be taken up and re-dealt, or one king must be slipped underneath.

You now proceed to play out the rest of the cards, those that are not suitable for the foundations or for the sequences of the square being placed in a talon.

There is no re-deal.

This game may be also played as follows:

Deal out a square of twelve single cards, then deal the rest of the pack as usual, the cards that are suitable being played on the foundations or married (in descending line) to those on the square, ready to be transferred to the foundations, the rest placed in a talon, and vacancies filled in the usual manner.

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